David Bradshaw

dbradsh's picture
Education: 
B.S. (Physics) Auburn University, 1982 Ph.D. (Philosophy) University of Texas, 1996
Research: 

Areas of Interest:

  • Ancient and medieval philosophy
  • Philosophy of religion
  • Historical interactions of philosophy and theology
  • Political philosophy

Research

            My research focuses on the ways that ancient Greek philosophy shaped medieval philosophy and religious thought, and how these, in turn, contributed to the formation of modernity.  Most of my work to date has been on the philosophical roots of the division between the Greek-speaking (eastern) and Latin-speaking (western) branches of Christianity.  From the standpoint of modern philosophy, Eastern Christian thought represents an important “road not taken.”   It shares the same classical and Biblical sources as medieval western philosophy, but its conclusions were often sharply different from those of the same period in the West.  It thus offers insight into the hidden potentialities of ancient thought.  Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom (2004) examines these East-West differences through the lens of “energeia,” a Greek term that lies at the root of both the concept of the divine energies (in the East) and that of God as pure act (in the West).  My more recent work has continued this comparative study with respect to other issues such as divine freedom, time and eternity, the nature of the will, and free will and predestination.  I have also worked on the medieval Jewish and Islamic traditions, attempting to point out parallels among the three great monotheistic traditions in the Middle Ages.  

Over the next few years I hope to explore more fully the implications of Eastern Christian thought for contemporary philosophy of religion.  Ultimately my goal is to use this work (both historical and contemporary) as a basis for a new analysis of precisely why modern philosophy rejected traditional religious belief, including in what respects this development was and was not justified.

 

 

Selected Publications: 

Books

  • Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom (Cambridge University Press, 2004; paperback 2007)
  • Editor, Philosophical Theology and the Christian Tradition: Russian and Western Perspectives (Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2012)
  • Editor, Ethics and the Challenge of Secularism: Russian and Western Perspectives (Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2013)

Articles (since 2006)

  • “Time and Eternity in the Greek Fathers,” The Thomist 70 (2006), 311-66
  • “The Divine Energies in the New Testament,” St. Vladimir’s Theological Quarterly 50 (2006), 189-223
  • “The Concept of the Divine Energies,” Philosophy and Theology 18 (2006), 93-120
  • “Augustine the Metaphysician,” Orthodox Readings of Augustine, ed. Aristotle Papanikolaou and George Demacopoulos (St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2008), 227-51
  • “The Opuscula Sacra: Boethius and Theology,” The Cambridge Companion to Boethius, ed. John Marenbon (Cambridge University Press, 2009), 105-28
  • “The Mind and the Heart in the Christian East and West,” Faith and Philosophy 26 (2009), 576-98
  • "Maximus the Confessor," The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, ed. Lloyd Gerson (Cambridge University Press, 2010), 813-28
  • “Divine Freedom in the Greek Patristic Tradition,” Quaestiones Disputatae 2 (2011), 56-69
  • “Divine Freedom: The Greek Fathers and the Modern Debate,” Philosophical Theology and the Christian Tradition: Russian and Western Perspectives, 77-92
  • “On Finding True Faith,” Turning East: Contemporary Philosophers and the Ancient Christian Faith, ed. Rico Vitz (St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2012), 17-32
  • “Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom in Maimonides and Gersonides,” Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 86 (2012), 75-87
  • “In Defense of the Essence/Energies Distinction: A Reply to Critics,” Divine Essence and Divine Energies: Ecumenical Reflections on the Presence of God in Eastern Orthodoxy, ed. C. Athanasopoulos and C. Schneider (James Clarke & Co., 2013), 256-73
  • “The Logoi of Beings in Greek Patristic Thought,” Toward an Ecology of Transfiguration: Orthodox Christian Perspectives on Environment, Nature, and Creation, ed. Bruce Foltz and John Chryssavgis (Fordham University Press, 2013), 9-22
  • “St. Maximus on the Will,” Knowing the Purpose of Creation through the Resurrection, ed. Bishop Maxim Vasiljević (Sebastian Press, 2013), 143-57
  • “The Cappadocian Fathers as Founders of Byzantine Thought,” The Cappadocian Legacy: A Critical Appraisal, ed. Doru Costache (St Andrew's Orthodox Press, 2013), 11-22
  • “Plato in the Cappadocian Fathers,” Plato in the Third Sophistic, ed. Ryan Fowler (De Gruyter, 2014), 193-210
  • “The Philosophical Theology of St. Cyril of Alexandria,” Phronema 29 (2014), 21-39

Courses taught (representative list)

  • PHI 260:  Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
  • PHI 335:  The Individual and Society
  • PHI 503:  Aristotle and Aristotelians on the Mind
  • PHI 503:  Nietzsche and the Greeks
  • PHI 504:  Islamic and Jewish Philosophy
  • PHI 506:  The Greek East and Latin West
  • PHI 506:  Neoplatonism
  • PHI 535:  Social and Political Philosophy
  • PHI 545:  Philosophy of Religion
  • PHI 630:  Virtue Ethics
  • PHI 700:  Plato’s Late Dialogues
  • PHI 700:  Aristotle’s Metaphysics and De Anima
  • PHI 700:  Aristotle and Plotinus

 

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