philosophy

Faculty Panel to Explore Issues of Affordable Care Act

A panel of faculty members will address a growing debate in national health care policy on Oct. 11 at 6 p.m. in the White Hall Classroom Building, Room 114.

Bishop to Lead Lecture in Research Ethics Lecture Series

The University of Kentucky Department of Philosophy and the UK Program for Bioethics will present the latest component in the Research Ethics Lecture Series Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Philosophy and Modern Life: David Bradshaw

From capitalism to transhumanism, the modern world is rife with uncertainty about the nature of society, ethical issues that surround technology, and places where the humanities and sciences intersect. The Philosophy and Modern Life series seeks to explore those issues throughout the fall. David Bradshaw from the Department of Philosophy gives a run-down of this semester's offerings. 

All events are free and open to the public, and the series is sponsored by the Philosophy Department.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

'Homegrown Kentucky' Empowers Eastern Ky. Community

Seven UK students created a project redefining community service. The group established a small-scale farm in Owsley County, Ky., revitalizing 10 acres of land owned by the school district, which will yield 100 percent of the produce for the local schools and aims to strengthen the county's economy.

Schatzki Delivers Distinguished Lecture: 'Practices, Governance and Sustainability'

A&S Associate Dean Ted Schatzki returns from England's University of Essex, having delivered social theory lecture.

PHI 120: Introductory Logic with Bob Sandmeyer

A course which treats argumentation, formal deductive and non-formal inductive logic. The course has a dual focus. First, students will learn how to construct and evaluate formal deductive arguments. Second, students will learn how to analyze and evaluate inductive arguments. The aim of the course is to inculcate standards of good reasoning, e.g., clarity, consistency and validity. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHI 320.

PHI 120: Introductory Logic with Bob Sandmeyer

A course which treats argumentation, formal deductive and non-formal inductive logic. The course has a dual focus. First, students will learn how to construct and evaluate formal deductive arguments. Second, students will learn how to analyze and evaluate inductive arguments. The aim of the course is to inculcate standards of good reasoning, e.g., clarity, consistency and validity

Dirk Sacré and Literary Latin: Terrence Tunberg

Latin may not be the standard language in everyday conversation anymore, but its use spans well after the fall of the Roman empire. In fact, a visiting scholar will be visiting UK on March 5th to talk about Latin's lasting literary legacy. Dirk Sacré, a professor at the Catholic University of Louvain Belgium, is going to present the talk "A Vast and Unexplored Continent: the Latin Literature of the 18th Century, at noon in room 208 of the Whitehall Classroom Building.

In this podcast, Terrence Tunberg, a professor in the Division of Classics and the Director of the UK Institute for Latin Studies, describes the importance of Latin in modern literature, and a bit about the lecture and Sacré's research. The talk is in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Graduate Curriculum in Latin Studies, based in the Division of Classics in MCLLC. The event is co-sponsored by the Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, the Department of History, and the Department of Philosophy.

This podcast was produced by Sam Burchett and Cheyenne Hohman.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Philosophy Speaker Series: Karen Bennett

WHAT: "By Our Bootstraps"
WHO: Karen Bennett, Cornell University
WHERE: Student Center Room 228
WHEN: Friday, March 2nd - 4:00p.m. 

Abstract:  Recently much has been made of the grounding relation, and of the idea that it is intimately tied to fundamentality. If A grounds B, then A is more fundamental than B (though not vice versa), and A is ungrounded if and only if it is fundamental full stop--absolutely fundamental. But here is a puzzle: is grounding itself absolutely fundamental? There are seemingly compelling reasons both to think that it must be, and to think that it cannot be. We face a dilemma, and a bad one. I distinguish two different regresses that appear to arise from the claim that grounding is itself grounded, and argue that both are merely apparent.

Date: 
Friday, March 2, 2012 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Student Center Room 228

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